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LARKIN BUILDING

by David Romero & Isostopy

About this project

“Wright’s ability to surprise, to get out of the script again and again, to never repeat himself and despite all to be able to maintain a coherent discourse within his long trajectory continues to amaze and thrill me in a way that few Architects in history have succeeded”.

Larkin Building VR is a project by David Romero and Isostopy to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright’s birth.

We have developed a free app, available for iOs and Android devices, to allow a virtual tour through the interior of one of the most emblematic Lloyd´s work: the Larking Administrative building, demolished in 1950.

Credits:

3D models development by David Romero

VR app production by Isostopy

Free download for iOs and Android           

Larkin Administrative Building

The Larkin Building was an early 20th century building. It was designed in 1903 by Frank Lloyd Wright and built in 1904-1906 for the Larkin Soap Company of Buffalo. The five story dark red brick building used pink tinted mortar and utilized steel frame construction. It was noted for many innovations, including air conditioning, built-in desk furniture, and suspended toilet partitions and bowls. Though this was an office building, it still caught the essence of Frank Lloyd Wright’s type of architecture. Sculptor Richard Bock provided ornamentation for the building. Exterior details of the building were executed in red sandstone; the entrance doors, windows, and skylights were of glass. Floors, desktops, and cabinet tops were covered with magnesite for sound absorption. Located at 680 Seneca Street, the Larkin Building was demolished in 1950.

LarkinBuilding
Frank Lloyd Wright
Frank-Lloyd

Wright gained such cultural primacy for good reason: he changed the way we build and live. Designing 1,114 architectural works of all types he created some of the most innovative spaces in the United States.

Over the course of his 70-year career, Wright became one of the most prolific, unorthodox and controversial masters of 20th-century architecture, creating no less than twelve of the Architectural Record’s hundred most important buildings of the century. Realizing the first truly American architecture, Frank Lloyd Wright’s houses, offices, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels and museums stand as testament to someone whose unwavering belief in his own convictions changed both his profession and his country.

“This labor is a tribute to the part of Wright`s legacy that for different reasons has not reached our days. Since it is not possible to visit these buildings the magic of technology allows us to see them as if they had always been here”.
-David Romero-

About the authors

David Romero

David Romero is an architect passionate about the history of architecture and the world of computer generated images that decided to join those two hobbies in the project Hooked on the Past. The project has received wide coverage by the media both specialized and generalists due to the high level of realism showing buildings of the past that for different reasons no longer exist or were never built. The project is currently focused on the work of the architect Frank Lloyd Wright, although David intends to extend it to other key architects in the history of architecture.

flickr  

Isostopy

Isostopy is a developer creative studio of virtual reality solutions located in Madrid, Spain. We create immersive experiences in which we emphasize quality and design. We provide transformative solutions in virtual and augmented reality for companies and brands with real needs.
Our scope of work is the industry, tourism, architecture and marketing. Furthermore, we also promote knowledge of VR through training classes, workshops and conferences at several events in universities and institutions.
Isostopy is formed by a creative and passionate team of architects, programmers, designers and experts in communication and narrative.

   

LARKING BUILDING VR

A PROJECT BY DAVID ORTEGA & ISOSTOPY